District election ballots have been mailed

The July election ballots for the Nebraska Soybean Board in districts 1 and 3 have been mailed to soybean farmers in those districts. Each district ballot contains important information that will make the voting process easy to complete and return.

If you are a qualified soybean farmer living in one of the election districts, the following candidates are asking for your vote. As a voter, you will learn about the candidates and why they would like to represent you on the board. If you have not received a ballot, please call 402-564-5827 and request one. Ballots must be postmarked by July 30, 2021, to count.

District 1 (Counties of Antelope, Boyd, Cedar, Holt, Knox, Madison and Pierce.)

Anne Meis (pursuing re-election) – Elgin, NE – Antelope County

Brandon Rosberg – Bloomfield, NE – Knox County

District 3 (Counties of Butler, Colfax, Dodge, Douglas, Sarpy, Saunders and Washington.)

Rebecca Kreikemeier – Bellwood, NE – Butler County

Ruth Ready – Scribner, NE – Dodge County

To view farmer biographies and more election info, visit nebraskasoybeans.org/your-voting-guide-for-the-nebraska-soybean-board-2021-elections.

The district 6 position on the Nebraska Soybean Board will be taken by Larry Tonniges of Utica. He ran unopposed; therefore, no election will be held.

Election results for district 1 and 3 will be announced in August.

About the Nebraska Soybean Board: The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one-half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

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The 2021 Nebraska Soybean Board election candidates

The Nebraska Soybean Board will have candidates running for the board in districts 1 and 3 for the 2021 elections. Anne Meis, running for re-election, and Brandon Rosberg will represent district 1. Rebecca Kreikemeier and Ruth Ready will represent district 3.

Ballots will be going out on July 15 in districts 1 and 3. If qualified producers do not receive a ballot by July 19, please call 402-564-5827 and request one. Return ballots should be postmarked by July 30st.

The Nebraska Soybean Board strongly encourages all Nebraska soybean farmers in districts 1 and 3 to vote and to get to know the board members once they take office. Learn more about the candidates below.

DISTRICT 1: Counties of Antelope, Boyd, Cedar, Holt, Knox, Madison and Pierce.

Anne Meis – Elgin, NE – Antelope County

“As a board member, I feel a responsibility to invest your checkoff dollars in programs that will increase the demand and value of our soybeans. I dig deep into proposals for their effectiveness by asking questions, reading outside sources and reviewing past effectiveness. I have been elected as chairwoman of USFRA, which is a national farmer-led organization advancing sustainability leadership of the U.S. food and agriculture sector. I would appreciate your vote to allow me to continue serving soybean farmers in District 1 through my leadership roles at the state and national levels.”

Brandon Rosberg – Bloomfield, NE – Knox County

“I would like the opportunity to serve on the Nebraska Soybean Board to be a voice for all soybean producers in my district and the state. I would like to see more domestic use of soybeans and soybean products here in the United States. While international trade is very important for our products and existing relationships should be maintained and newly cultivated, domestic demand would create a stronger and more consistent market for producers. I would also like to be a voice for financial discipline of producers’ checkoff dollars.”

 

DISTRICT 3: Counties of Butler, Colfax, Dodge, Douglas, Sarpy, Saunders and Washington.

Rebecca Kreikemeier – Bellwood, NE – Butler County

“I would say my most important concern for the Nebraska Soybean Board would be how we are adapting our current practices and keeping step with the rapidly changing web-based world our farmers are confronted with. We need to look at the world through the eyes of future farmers and not abandon the commitment of excellence of our past producers.”

Ruth Ready – Scribner, NE – Dodge County

“As a member of the Nebraska Soybean Board, I look forward to helping other farmers be successful in their soybean growing and marketing efforts. The Nebraska Soybean Board has much to offer soybean producers, and I would like to help farmers utilize what is available to them. Strengthening connections with other parts of the soybean complex is also of interest to me. All parts of the soybean production, marketing and utilization chain are vital and need to be supported. I hope to be able to help provide that support as part of the Nebraska Soybean Board.”

The district 6 position on the Nebraska Soybean Board will be taken by Larry Tonniges of Utica. He ran unopposed; therefore, no election will be held.

To view farmer biographies and more election info, visit:

nebraskasoybeans.org/your-voting-guide-for-the-nebraska-soybean-board-2021-elections

About the Nebraska Soybean Board: The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one-half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

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Nebraska Soybean Board to meet

The Nebraska Soybean Board (NSB) will hold its next meeting on June 30 – July 1, 2021 at the Younes Conference Center located at 416 Talmadge Street, Kearney, Nebraska.

Among conducting regular board business, the Board will review FY22 proposals and other new opportunities. The meeting is open to the public and will provide an opportunity for public discussion. The complete agenda for the meeting is available for inspection on the Nebraska Soybean Board website at www.nebraskasoybeans.org

About the Nebraska Soybean Board: The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one-half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

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Jones joins Nebraska Soybean Board as market development coordinator

The Nebraska Soybean Board is pleased to announce the hiring of Catherine Jones as market development coordinator.

In her position, Jones will handle the development of domestic and international marketing programs that the Nebraska Soybean Board invests the checkoff into each year. This role is integral in building and sustaining soybean demand while looking for new opportunities for the many uses that soybeans bring to consumers, customers and industrial industries. 

“We are excited to have added such a valuable asset to our team. Catherine’s passion and knowledge for agriculture will help to continue to grow our marketing department,” said Scott Ritzman, executive director of the Nebraska Soybean Board. “On behalf of our staff, we welcome Catherine to be a part of the soybean checkoff team. Her past experiences should serve her well in the market development position.”

Catherine grew up on a small acreage in Bellevue, Nebraska and graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in May of 2019 with a degree in Agricultural and Environmental Science Communication. She then went on to earn her Master of Agricultural and Environmental Education from the University of Georgia. Catherine’s educational and experiential background prepared her to be well-rounded in research writing and strategic communication.

“Critically thinking about the presence of the agricultural industry in consumers and farmers lives, along with the many stakeholders invested has always been important to me and I am honored to be part of a team working to enhance consumer education, investigate innovative research and create demand for soybean products,” said Jones. “Through my experiences I have found a passion for research and communication, and I am looking forward to bringing those strengths to my position with the Nebraska Soybean Board.”

Jones started her role on May 17. She can be contacted and welcomed at catherine@nebraskasoybeans.org.

 

About the Nebraska Soybean Board: The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one-half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

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Catherine Jones is the new market development coordinator for the Nebraska Soybean Board. She began her role on May 17.

 

Researchers find increased use of biodiesel saves lives, results in cost savings

New study shows the low-carbon fuel would decrease premature deaths, reduce cancer risk and alleviate asthma complications for thousands of Americans

 A new study from Trinity Consultants demonstrates that switching to biodiesel results in a multitude of benefits at the neighborhood level, including significant health benefits such as decreased cancer risk, fewer premature deaths and reduced asthma attacks.

The study, sponsored by the National Biodiesel Board with support from the Nebraska Soybean Board, South Dakota Soybean Research & Promotion Council, California Advanced Biofuels Alliance, Iowa Soybean Board and the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, used well established EPA air dispersion modeling tools coupled with health risk assessments and benefit valuations to assess the public health benefits and resulting economic savings of converting from petroleum-based diesel to 100% biodiesel, known as B100, in 13 sites and communities in the U.S. exposed to high rates of petroleum diesel pollution. Biodiesel is a readily available, low-carbon, renewable fuel made from a diverse mix of resources such as recycled cooking oil, soybean oil and animal fats.

“We have always known that biodiesel offers a better and cleaner alternative to petroleum diesel,” National Biodiesel Board CEO Donnell Rehagen said. “This study quantifies the health benefits and shows that by using renewable fuels like biodiesel and renewable diesel, we are bringing positive change to people’s lives, the nation’s health and the economy.”

Researchers found that switching to 100% biodiesel for home heating oil and transportation would annually bring the 13 communities studied:

  • 340 fewer premature deaths.
  • 46,000 fewer lost workdays.
  • $3 billion in avoided health care costs.

In the transportation sector, benefits included a potential 45% reduction in cancer risk when heavy-duty trucks such as semis use B100 and 203,000 fewer or lessened asthma attacks.

When Bioheat® fuel made from 100% biodiesel is used in place of petroleum heating oil, the study found an 86% reduced cancer risk and 17,000 fewer lung problems.

The study also considered the economic cost of premature deaths, asthma cases, reduced activity due to poor health, and work impacted due to sick days. For example, researchers found the communities surrounding the Port of Los Angeles/Long Beach would avoid about $1.69 billion in health costs due to improved air quality in the form of reduced premature deaths and health care costs and increased productivity.

As these numbers represent findings from just 13 sites and communities, they are truly the tip of the iceberg. Rehagen noted that B100 can achieve these benefits by reducing pollution from markets that are hardest to decarbonize: heavy-duty transportation and residential heating.

“Saving lives by reducing the health impacts of transportation and home heating fuels is a priority, and biodiesel is widely available today to achieve that goal,” he said. “These immediate and substantial emissions and health benefits can and should be an important part in any state, regional or national climate program as our nation moves toward decarbonization through advanced alternative fuels like biodiesel and renewable diesel. The immediacy of these potential health benefits, especially for disadvantaged communities, is even more critical when one considers the years it will take for states to pursue deep electrification and other decarbonization strategies.”

The study was conducted by Trinity Consultants, which has over 40 years of experience conducting air dispersion modeling and related health risk assessments, among its many areas of expertise. Trinity operates 69 offices internationally and has performed air dispersion modeling for industrial facilities, utilities and government agencies.

 

Made from an increasingly diverse mix of resources such as recycled cooking oil, soybean oil and animal fats, biodiesel and renewable diesel are better, cleaner fuels that are available now for use in existing diesel engines without modification. NBB is the U.S. trade association representing the entire biodiesel and renewable diesel value chain, including producers, feedstock suppliers, and fuel distributors.

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For more about biodiesel, visit http://www.biodiesel.org.

Renewable Fuels Month spotlights benefits of homegrown fuel options

As temperatures begin to rise and schools dismiss for the school year, families may soon be hitting the road to enjoy summer vacations. The month of May typically kicks off the summer driving season, and it’s also a time to celebrate Nebraska’s biofuel industries through Renewable Fuels Month. Since 2006, the acting Nebraska governor has dedicated one month out of each year to recognize the importance of renewable biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel.

Nationally, Nebraska ranks No. 2 in ethanol production with 25 ethanol plants across the state. The industry employs over 1,400 Nebraskans in rural areas of the state. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, ethanol is currently blended in over 95% of the nation’s fuel supply. A healthy ethanol sector boosts Nebraska’s corn and livestock industries and adds to a thriving state economy.

“As a corn and cattle farmer, ethanol is vital to my farming operation,” said David Bruntz, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board (NCB) and farmer from Friend. “In Nebraska, 31% of our state’s corn is used in ethanol production. From the production of ethanol, we also get distillers grains, a protein-rich livestock feed for my cattle. For every bushel of corn used for ethanol, we’re able to get a cleaner-burning fuel and co-products for our value-added livestock industries.”

Each year, Nebraska’s ethanol industry produces nearly 2.1 billion gallons of ethanol, which are used locally, domestically and abroad. While ethanol supports the state’s agricultural industry and rural economies, it also benefits consumers in numerable ways.

“By using ethanol blends, consumers are really improving our environment and enhancing their engine performance all while saving money,” said Jan tenBensel, chairman of the Nebraska Ethanol Board (NEB) and farmer from Cambridge. “Ethanol is a fuel made from plants, which makes it renewable, unlike petroleum. It’s cleaner-burning and reduces the emissions of cancer-causing chemicals into the atmosphere from the tailpipe. Ethanol is also a natural octane booster, which supports overall engine performance. You would think a fuel like this would cost more, but it’s actually less expensive at the pumps.”

As environmental issues continue to spark national discussions, both ethanol and biodiesel are well-suited to combat global warming and promote cleaner air. Ethanol blends can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 43% compared to regular gasoline, and biodiesel can reduce lifecycle emissions by 86% compared to petroleum-based diesel fuel.

Like ethanol, the biodiesel industry works synergistically with Nebraska’s livestock sector. A healthy biodiesel industry provides nearly $58.5 million dollars a year in aggregate benefits to beef and pork producers due to decreased meal expenses and the use of inedible tallow and white grease as a biodiesel feedstock. An estimated 7.86 billion pounds of soybean oil went to biodiesel production in 2019-’20.

“Farmers are always looking for ways to maximize overall efficiency and productivity, and the same holds true for our biofuel industries” said Eugene Goering, chairman of the Nebraska Soybean Board and farmer from Columbus. “Science and technology continue to improve, so we’re able to produce even better fuels while reducing our overall environmental impact.”

Renewable Fuels Month kicked off with the Lincoln Marathon/Half Marathon on May 2. For the third year in a row, NCB and NEB joined forces to promote ethanol to runners and spectators from all over the United States. Later in the month, Gov. Pete Ricketts will sign an official proclamation declaring May as Renewable Fuels Month in Nebraska. Additionally, several ethanol pump promotions will be held across the state. For times and locations, visit FueledByNebraska.com.

“We’re really excited about Renewable Fuels Month as we work to share the benefits of biofuels with our state and its people,” said Tony Leiding, president of Renewable Fuels Nebraska. “I encourage everyone to help us celebrate throughout the month and continue to use higher ethanol blends throughout the summer driving season.”

Throughout May, follow the Nebraska Corn Board, the Nebraska Ethanol Board, Renewable Fuels Nebraska and the Nebraska Soybean Board on social media to keep up to date with current promotions and social media contests.

 

The Nebraska Corn Board is a state funded agency funded through a ½-cent-per-bushel checkoff on all corn marketed in the state. The mission of the Nebraska Corn Board is to promote the value of corn by creating opportunities. Checkoff funds are invested in programs of market development, research, promotion and education.

The Nebraska Ethanol Board works to ensure strong public policy and consumer support for biofuels. Since 1971, the independent state agency has designed and managed programs to expand production, market access, worker safety and technology innovation, including recruitment of producers interested in developing conventional ethanol, as well as bio-products from the ethanol platform.

The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

Renewable Fuels Nebraska (RFN) is the trade association for Nebraska’s ethanol industry. RFN is a resource for advocating for policy that ensures the growth and expansion of the nation’s second largest renewable fuels industry through advocacy, market access and public awareness.

 

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Biodiesel: B20 (6% to 20%) is a common biodiesel blend because it represents a good balance of cost, emissions and cold-weather performance. Generally, B20 and lower-level blends can be used in current engines without modifications.

Earth Day demonstration of new, soy-based product in Lincoln

An exciting demonstration of a new use for soybean oil is coming to the city campus at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. On April 22, 2021, also recognized as Earth Day, a soy-based asphalt rejuvenator will be applied to the roof of Brace Laboratory located at 510 Stadium Dr, Lincoln, Nebraska. The event will begin at 11:00 a.m.

The soy-based and USDA Certified Biobased Product is provided by Roof Maxx, headquartered in Westerville, Ohio. The goal of the product is to extend the life and increase durability of an existing asphalt shingle roof.

Developed by Battelle Labs, Roof Maxx is the first soy-based, roof-rejuvenating spray treatment that restores a roof’s flexibility and waterproofing protection, extending the life of a roof by up to 15 years. Due to the incorporation of soy, Roof Maxx provides a safe option for people, pets, property and the environment.

The outdoor educational demonstration will be open to the public and media. The event will begin with a line-up of speakers, followed by the demonstration. The demonstration will be visible from ground-level, followed by time for interviews. More details regarding final times, speaker line-up and parking are forthcoming.

To further highlight Earth Day, the initiative and demonstration fits into the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Environment, Sustainability and Resilience Master Plan, released in November of 2020. Under the Energy portion of the plan, the aspiration goal works to establish the policy, governance and administrative infrastructure that results in a highly-efficient campus with net-zero CO2 emissions and net zero energy readiness by 2050.

“While this is not a product developed at UNL, Nebraska researchers are also working to find ways to add value to our state’s agricultural products through the development of renewable chemicals, polymers and fuels,” said Loren Isom, assistant director of UNL’s Industrial Ag Products Center. “Development of new bioproducts like this one can benefit Nebraska producers, businesses and the environment.”

A recent study and poster presentation by The Ohio State University speaks to the eco-friendly technology. According to the study, approximately 7 percent of U.S. roofs are replaced every year. If even 1 percent of single-family homes (about 15 percent of yearly replacements) applied a SMEE (Soy Methyl Ester Emulsion) formula like Roof Maxx instead of replacing their roof, we would avoid 5.6 billion pounds of landfill waste and 1.1 million metric tons of CO2 equivalents in emissions.

“The Nebraska Soybean Board is excited to get involved with this demonstration to highlight the power of soybean oil,” says Richard Bartek, District 3 board member on the Nebraska Soybean Board and farmer from Ithaca. “This renewable alternative unlocks another use that drives demand for soybeans and joins as one of the 1,000 soy-based products currently on the market.”

“There are many great things about Roof Maxx that it’s hard not to love,” says Jeremy Schafer, a Nebraska Roof Maxx dealer. “Being able to offer a faster, more affordable alternative to an expensive roof replacement. Our SoyFusion technology is backed by the farmers, 100% green, and offers yet another great soybean product to the market. Born and raised in Nebraska it makes me proud to know we can make an impact on our local landfill and support soybean farmers.”

This collaborative demonstration includes Roof Maxx, the Nebraska Soybean Board and the Industrial Agricultural Products Center at UNL. The application will be sponsored by Roof Maxx and the Nebraska Soybean Board, at no cost to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

 

UNL COVID-19 Event Policies Please plan to practice social distancing, by maintaining six feet of distance from others. Facial coverings are also required in outdoor settings on the UNL campus if safe social distancing and gathering practices are not possible.

Photo caption: Brace Laboratory on UNL’s city campus is a good candidate for an application of the soy-based asphalt rejuvenator. Roof Maxx is a cost effective and green solution that can restore the flexibility of any asphalt roof.

About Roof Maxx: Roof Maxx Technologies, LLC, is the provider of Roof Maxx®, a scientifically formulated, and 100% safe, plant-based roof rejuvenating spray treatment that was developed by Battelle Labs, the world’s largest private research and development company. As a company, Roof Maxx is innovating a new breed of innovative roofers who are available in more than 400 cities across 47 states. When used every five years, Roof Maxx can extend the life of a roof by as many as 15 additional years, which makes it highly cost-effective as well. For more information, visit www.roofmaxx.com.

About the Nebraska Soybean Board: The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one-half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

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Grain Bins are the Focus of Annual Safety Week

Grain Bins are the Focus of Annual Safety Week

Nebraska farmers continue to be good stewards of the land, producing more bushels with less resources. Because of this increased efficiency, on-farm grain storage is on the rise. With additional grain bins on farms and on commercial sites, there is a greater risk of fatal accidents. The checkoff organizations of Nebraska’s corn, soybean, wheat and sorghum industries (and their respective associations), remind farmers and agricultural workers to be safe in and around grain bins during the fifth annual “Stand Up 4 Grain Safety Week.”

“Stand Up 4 Grain Safety Week” takes place March 29 through April 2 and is organized through an alliance between the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Grain and Feed Association, the Grain Elevator and Processing Society and the Grain Handling Safety Council.

“Farming is one of the most hazardous industries we have in the United States,” said David Bruntz, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board and farmer from Friend. “We often hear of unimaginable accidents in agriculture because there are a lot of moving parts and large pieces of machinery to work with. Nebraska Corn regularly reminds farmers to take a second for safety, because many accidents and fatalities can be prevented with just a little added caution.”

There are several hazards associated with grain bins, including engulfments and entanglements. An engulfment happens when grain flows downward and forms a funnel, pulling a person down to the point of full immersion. An entanglement could occur when farmers or agricultural employees work in close proximity to grain augers. The danger in operating an auger is getting caught in a moving part.

“As we look at engulfments and entanglements, there’s a common theme, which is they both happen quickly,” said Eugene Goering, chairman of the Nebraska Soybean Board and farmer from Columbus. “The risk is high for both young and old, those new to the occupation and those who are seasoned farmers. It’s essential everyone working in and around grain bins educates themselves about proper safety protocol.”

With the proper safety procedures, grain bin accidents are preventable. It is important to follow all the safety rules when it comes to working with grain stored in bins. Here are a few grain bin safety tips to keep in mind when you are working with stored grain:

  • Use inspection holes or grain level markers to understand what is happening inside the bin. Use a pole from outside the bin to break up grain bridges.
  • You should enter a grain bin only if absolutely necessary. If you must get into the bin, use a body harness secured to the outside of the bin. Have at least two people watching over you as you enter and work inside the bin.
  • Use hand signals to communicate—and make sure everyone you are working with knows what those signals are.

“We know farmers are anxious to get back in the fields this spring, so many are now busy working with their previous crops stored on-farm,” said Bob Delsing, chairman of the Nebraska Wheat Board and farmer from Hemingford. “By dedicating a week to the importance of grain bin safety, we can hopefully serve as that friendly reminder to always be prepared, knowledgeable and responsible when working in and around grain bins.”

Throughout the week, Nebraska’s corn, soybean, wheat and sorghum checkoffs and their respective associations will be sharing grain bin safety tips from their social media channels. More information can also be found at standup4grainsafety.org.

“We know farming is a risky business but through proper safety procedures, we can greatly reduce the chance for injury or even death,” said Mike Baker, chairman of the Nebraska Grain Sorghum Board and farmer from Trenton. “A few extra moments of caution far outweigh possible accidents.”

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Photo caption: Grain bins are an important component of Nebraska’s agricultural landscape. In 2019, for example, 14.65 billion bushels of corn and soybeans were stored in bins in the U.S.

Nebraska Soybean Board to meet

The Nebraska Soybean Board (NSB) will hold its next meeting on March 23-24, 2021 at the Embassy Suites located at 1040 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Among conducting regular board business, the Board will review FY22 research proposals and other new opportunities. Due to the limitations and following CDC guidelines and the Department of Health Services, NSB is limiting guests to attend the in-person meeting. Registration for attending through Zoom and the complete agenda for the meeting is available for inspection on the Nebraska Soybean Board website at www.nebraskasoybeans.org

About the Nebraska Soybean Board: The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one-half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

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